Monday, January 15, 2018

Week oj January 16, 2018


Winter MAP Testing Begins
MAP testing will begin this week for students in 
Grades K-2 in Mathematics and Reading 
Please check the monthly calendar for dates of testing for all grades.
Parent reports will be available after February 5th.

Parents may want to view a short video on Growth Mindset which is part of the MAP testing program.  Click the link below.

Carol Dweck in an animated presentation on mindsets – In this animation, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yl9TVbAal5s
Carol Dweck gives a brief and compelling synopsis of the theory of fixed and growth mindset.

“How to Help Every Child Fulfill Their Potential” 



Whose the Boss? Workshop for Parents 
All PreK Parents Welcome 
Annette Pastor - NYCDOE Social Worker
Wednesday January 17, 2018
School Library 
8:30 AM 

Children’s Lying

            In this New York Times article, author Alex Stone reports on the surprising outcomes of a study of young people’s dishonesty. Researchers told children not to look at a hidden toy and then made an excuse to leave the room. Within seconds of being left alone, the vast majority of children peeked at the toy. When the researcher returned, a significant number who had looked said they hadn’t. “At least a third of 2-year-olds, half of 3-year-olds, and 80 percent or more of children 4 and older will deny their transgression,” says Stone, “regardless of their gender, race, or family’s religion.” What’s more, none of the adults who spoke with children afterward, even their parents, were able to consistently tell who was lying and who was telling the truth.
            A number of studies conducted by developmental psychologist Michael Lewis and others have reached these conclusions:
-    Toddlers who lie have higher verbal I.Q.s than those who tell the truth (as much as 10 points higher).
-    Children who don’t peek at the toy have the highest I.Q.s of all – but there are very few of them.
-    Children who lie have better executive functioning skills (the ability to control impulses and stay focused on a task) and theory of mind (the ability to see the world through other people’s eyes) than those who don’t.
-    Children with autism and ADHD have trouble lying.
Interestingly, teaching children executive functioning skills and theory of mind makes them more likely to lie.
            All this is intriguing, but parents and teachers want children to be honest – which can be crucial in cases involving maltreatment or abuse – and to grow up to be reliable and decent people. What makes children more likely to tell the truth? Here’s what researchers have found:
            • Carrots work better than sticks. Harsh punishments like spanking do little to deter lying and may be counterproductive. In one study in Africa, children in a school practicing corporal punishment were more likely to lie and were far better at it than those attending a school that used gentler methods.
            • Witnessing other children being praised for honesty tends to produce more honest behavior. So do non-punitive appeals – “If you tell the truth, I will be really pleased with you.”
            • Eliciting an up-front promise to tell the truth has been shown to work. Getting children to make a verbal commitment not to lie was even effective in the toy-peeking experiment.
            • Positive stories work better than negative and scary ones. Reading about George Washington telling the truth about cutting down the cherry tree is more effective than reading “Pinocchio” and “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” It’s about positive messaging – emphasizing the benefits of honesty rather than the problems caused by dishonesty.
            • Bribery can work – as long as the financial reward for honesty is considerably bigger than the perceived benefit of lying. Psychologist Kang Lee, who conducted an experiment in which children got different rewards for each kind of behavior, found there was a sharp increase in honest behavior when the reward reached a certain point. “Their decision to lie is very tactical,” he said. “Children are thinking in terms of the ratio.”

“Is Your Child Lying to You? That’s Good” by Alex Stone in The New York Times, January 7, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/opinion/sunday/children-lying-intelligence.html
Sacrament of Reconciliation Classes
As mentioned by Mr. Woods after Mass. 
Students in the Sacrament of Reconciliation Class will have class on Fridays from 3:15 PM - 4:00 PM. 
These are required classes for students who are in the program.
Classes will begin Friday January 19, 2018. 

Tuesday January 16, 2018
Mid Terms - ELA Grades 3-8

Wednesday January 17, 2018 - Feast of St. Anthony
Mid Terms - Mathematics Grades 3-8
MAP Testing Mathematics Grades K-2
PreK For All Coach will be working with students and teachers.
Whose The Boss? - Workshop in Library 8:30 AM. 
All PreK Parents  -   Annette Pastor, NYCDOE - Social Worker.

Thursday January 18, 2018 
MID-Term Science Grades 3-8 
MAP Testing Grades K-2 Reading 

Friday January 19, 2018 
MAP make up testing
PreK For All Building Blocks Coach will be working with students and teachers today.
3:15 PM - 4:00 PM Sacrament of Reconciliation Class -
Ms. Coello and Mr. Woods 

Sunday January 21, 2018 
Mass for all students in sacramental classes 1:00 PM 






Monday, January 8, 2018

Week of January 8, 2018

Winter MAP Testing Begins
MAP testing will begin this week for students in 
Grades 3-8 in ELA
Please check the monthly calendar for dates of testing for all grades.
Parent reports will be available after February 5th.

Parents may want to view a short video on Growth Mindset which is part of the MAP testing program.  Click the link below.

Carol Dweck in an animated presentation on mindsets – In this animation, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yl9TVbAal5s
Carol Dweck gives a brief and compelling synopsis of the theory of fixed and growth mindset.

“How to Help Every Child Fulfill Their Potential” 



School will be open:
 Friday March 16, 2018
&
 Friday June 15, 2018
to make up the snow day and the day we closed because of a broken boiler. This is to keep in alignment of the NYS Education Law requiring 175 school days and  5 conference days  for a total of 180 days.

Sacrament of Reconciliation Classes
As mentioned by Mr. Woods after Mass on Sunday. 
Students in the Sacrament of Reconciliation Class will have class on Fridays from 3:15 PM - 4:00 PM. 
These are required classes for students who are in the program.
Classes will begin Friday January 19, 2018. 

Progress Reports/ Report Cards  Tuition
Progress Reports were sent home on Friday January 5, 2018.
These reports give a glimpse of how a child is doing to date and should be wake up call for some students before 
Mid-Terms and MAP testing begins.
Report Cards will be distributed on February 1, 2018.
Parents are reminded that tuition must be up to date for children to receive their report card. Please call Smart Tuition if you have any questions regarding your tuition and/or see Mr. Guzman in the school office.




Registration facts for the 2018-2019 School Year 
December 1, 2017 :
Admissions open for NEW families
January 19, 2018:
Registrations for NEW and RETURNING families open
Re-Qualification for Financial Assistance opens for RETURNING families
Tuition & Fee rate sheets  will be available on January 12, 2018.

February 1, 2018:
Deadline for NEW families to submit complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications, including all required documentation, in order to receive a decision regarding Financial Assistance by March 15.

March 15, 2018:

Families who have submitted complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications (including all required documentation) and who have been accepted by the school of interest by February 1, will receive email notices informing them of the results of their Financial Assistance applications by this date.


Registration for students born in 2014
February 5, 2018-March 30, 2018
online - schools.nyc.org
Program Code for OLQM: 06MAFQ
if you have questions please see Mr. Guzman in the office.

Monday January 8, 2018
School Closed for Boiler Repair

Tuesday January 9, 2018
Mid Year Exam Material will be posted on teacher's blog for students in Grades 3-8
PreK For All Coach will be working with students in the PreK For All Program

Wednesday January 10, 2018 
PreK-1 Parent Meeting - Mrs. Fundora's class 8:30 AM in library regarding registration for 2018-2019

MAP Testing Grades 3-8 - ELA 

Math Coach will work with students in Grades 5-8

Thursday January 11, 2018 

PreK-2 Parent Meeting - Ms. Rodriguez's class 8:30 AM in library regarding registration for the 2018-2019 school year.

MAP Testing Grades 6-8 - ELA

Friday January 12, 2018
Principal Cohort Meeting here at OLQM 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM 

PreK For All Coach will be working with students 

Sunday January 14, 2018
Students attend Mass with their parents - holiday weekend.
School office closed.

Monday January 15, 2018
Martin Luther King Jr. Day - School Closed
Mr. Woods will be in office 9:?00 AM - 4:00 PM if parents wish to see him.




Saturday, December 30, 2017

Week of January 1, 2018








Which Students Have a Growth Mindset and Which Don’t?

            In this Brookings research paper, Susana Claro and Susanna Loeb report on a study assessing growth mindsets in 125,000 California students in grades 4-7 in five school districts. The researchers measured students’ mindset based on their responses to these statements:
-    My intelligence is something that I can’t change very much.
-    Challenging myself won’t make me any smarter.
-    There are some things I’m not capable of learning.
-    If I am not naturally smart in a subject, I will never do well in it.
For each question, students answered Not at All True, A Little True, Somewhat True, Mostly True, or Completely True. The researchers came to three major conclusions:
            • Students in all subgroups who had a growth mindset scored higher on standardized tests of reading and math and had bigger learning gains each year than otherwise similar students who didn’t have a growth mindset. Claro and Loeb estimate that the difference made by having a growth mindset (versus a neutral mindset) was the equivalent of 19 days of learning – almost a calendar month of school.
            • Girls had more of a growth mindset than boys up to seventh grade, at which point the mindset gap began to close.
            “While this study is just a first step in assessing the effects of mindset on a large population of students and the role of schools in building mindset,” conclude Claro and Loeb, “the findings provide initial evidence that it may be beneficial to monitor the levels of growth mindset in the population and convey to students that the brain is malleable.”

“New Evidence That Students’ Beliefs About Their Brains Drive Learning” by Susana Claro and Susanna Loeb in Brookings Research, November 9, 2017.

As a reminder to parents the MAP (Measures of Academic Progress) testing that is administered three times a year measures how children's mindset grows over the course of the year.
 


 
Registration facts for the 2018-2019 School Year 
December 1, 2017 :
Admissions open for NEW families
January 19, 2018:
Registrations for NEW and RETURNING families open
Re-Qualification for Financial Assistance opens for RETURNING families
Tuition & Fee rate sheets  will be available on January 12, 2018.

February 1, 2018:
Deadline for NEW families to submit complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications, including all required documentation, in order to receive a decision regarding Financial Assistance by March 15.

March 15, 2018:
Families who have submitted complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications (including all required documentation) and who have been accepted by the school of interest by February 1, will receive email notices informing them of the results of their Financial Assistance applications by this date.
 
Parents and MAP Growth – 7 Things to Know
First, what is MAP Growth? Unlike the paper-and-pencil tests of days gone by, where all students were asked the same questions and spent a fixed amount of time taking the test, MAP Growth is a computer adaptive test—which means every student gets a unique set of test questions based on their responses to previous questions. The purpose of MAP Growth is to determine what the student knows and is ready to learn next.
MAP Growth tracks student growth over time – wherever they are starting from and regardless of the grade they are in. For instance, if a third grader is actually reading like a fifth grader, MAP Growth will be able to identify that. Or, if a fifth grader is doing math like a third grader, MAP Growth will identify that, too. Both things are incredibly important for teachers to know so that they can plan instruction efficiently.
Did you know?
  1. Archdiocesesan schools administer MAP Growth three times per year – in fall, winter, and spring. 
  2. The winter testing window opens January 9th and closes January 26th for students in K - 8.
  3. As the student answers correctly, questions get harder. If the student answers incorrectly, the questions get easier. By the end of the test, students will have answered enough questions to inform a teacher about what they know and what they’re ready to learn.
  4. MAP Growth is grade independent, which means teachers and parents can see where a child is performing relative to grade level – not merely if they are at grade level or not.
  5. MAP Growth assesses math, reading, language usage, and science.
  6. MAP Growth takes less than an hour to complete – but is not timed. Students can take as much time as needed.
  7. The score your child receives is called a RIT score. You’ll be able to see your child’s RIT score progress from test to test, and year to year.
  8. The RIT score can be connected to online resources, such as Khan Academy for math exercises and com to determine what books might be at the appropriate reading level. You can even plug their RIT score into our College Explorer tool to see what colleges your child is on track to attend.
Parents who have  further questions should click the links in the paragraphs above for more information and feel free to speak to your child's teacher or see Mr. Woods on Sundays from 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM.
 
 
 
Wednesday January 3, 2018
School Reopens  
January Calendars will be sent home.

Thursday January 4, 2018 - Feast of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Mass at 9:00 AM led by students of the 8th grade.
Parents Welcome

Friday January 5, 2017
Tuition Due to Smart Tuition 
Progress Reports sent home today with all students.
Math Coach will work with students in Grades 5-8

Sunday January 7th 
Living Environment Class 9:00 AM
Mass for students in sacramental program 1:00 PM 



Sunday, December 17, 2017

Week pg December 18,2017 Annoncements


Guidance for Parents on Educational Apps

            In this New York Times article, Tara Haelle quotes Ellen Wartella, director of the Center on Media and Human Development at Northwestern University: “There really does need to be some sort of Good Housekeeping seal of approval to say this is a good app, but we don’t have that yet.” While we wait for authoritative guidance, Haelle suggests that teachers and parents apply these criteria when appraising apps that claim to be educational:
-    Does it have clearly defined, measurable objectives that build on existing skills?
-    Does it connect new learning to existing knowledge?
-    Can kids transfer what they learn to real life?
-    Does it actively engage the child? Is it fun?
-    Is it empowering for kids? Is it an active versus a passive experience?
-    Does it have features that make it socially interactive?
-    Is it adaptive, adjusting to errors and giving feedback as kids play with it?
-    Does it have distractions that interrupt the learning experience?
“When an app is well-designed, with a clear goal to support a skill and clear target audience,” says Jessica Taylor Piotrowski of the Center for Research on Children, Adolescents, and the Media at the University of Amsterdam, “and really relies on these principles of being active, engaged, meaningful, and socially interactive, it works, it absolutely works. But some of these apps are playful experiences that enable creativity and problem-solving, and they can be just as valuable.”
Haelle goes on to suggest several questions that educators and parents should ask about apps as they pick and choose from hundreds of possibilities:
Does the app seem right for its users? This involves watching kids playing with the app and seeing where it falls on the continuum from serious learning to just play.
Who created it? Pretty much anything from PBS is going to be high-quality, says Haelle. With other companies, see if educators were involved in the development process. Big names like Disney and Nickelodeon don’t always produce good educational apps, while some little-known companies like Tinybop have some excellent  products.
            • Trust the experts. Common Sense Media is a good source of information on apps, says Haelle. Children’s Technology Review (Ctrex) also does helpful reviews, often including video clips of the app in action.
            • Does it have advertising or in-app purchases? PBS apps are free with no strings attached, but others support themselves with commercial links. Poptropica, for example, is a fun app with some educational content, but it can seem like “one long advertisement for Kellogg brand cereals,” says David Hill, chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Communications and Media. Some apps offer a “freemium” app that lets users download a partial version to try before paying for the full-featured version.
            • Does the app protect children’s privacy? Be wary of apps that ask for too much information on a child. Products for children under 13 should be compliant with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). But anonymity is a double-edged sword, warns Haelle. “In social apps, complete anonymity can open the door to bullying if kids don’t feel accountable for their words.” Does the app make it easy to report abuse? Roblox is an example of an app with multiple safeguards for kids.
            • Does the app do something only an app can do? Flashcards and worksheets are a waste of technology. A good app should “bring to life an experience that’s impossible to create off screen,” says Christine Elgersma of Common Sense Media. Examples include these Tinybop apps: The Earth, Robot Factory, Space, Skyscrapers, and The Human Body. Another good one is Homer, a literacy app that allows kids to send their creations to approved family members and educators.
            • Everything in moderation. How much app playing is too much? “It’s a question of balance over the course of the day,” says Wartella, who recommends technology-free zones such as mealtimes and bedtime. The American Academy of Pediatrics has a personalized family media use planning tool at www.Healthychildren.org. App use should make room for physical activity, homework, reading, and social interactions – and of course eating and sleeping.
            • Co-play. There is some evidence that when children use an app with another person, there are more benefits than from solo use. When parents or teachers use an app with a child, there are additional benefits: “A parent can really be a bridge to transfer any learning an app has to the real world so it’s not isolated to a screen when the tablet cover is closed,” says Elgersma. “Co-use and co-play – that is one of the most powerful ways that apps can be educational.”
From her informal network of parents and educators, Haelle recommends several apps: RazKids, Dragonbox, Starfall, Bedtime Math, IXL apps, Scribblenauts, Endless Alphabet, Spelling City, TumbleBooks, Epic!, and ABC Mouse.

“How to Decide Which Educational Apps Make the Grade” by Tara Haelle in The New York Times, December 7, 2017,  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/05/smarter-living/educational-apps-kids.html

Chocolate Bars for Fund Raising 
Recently there have been a number of parents who were unaware of the fund raising requirement of either paying $175.00 to Smart Tuition or selling candy bars.  This was stated on this blog for three weeks in September (please scroll back to September to see the announcements) along with the policy that it is an either/or scenario - either parents opt to sell candy bars to defer them making payments directly out of pocket OR pay out of pocket. 
 The registration form on TADS does mention all these facets.
The September notices gave a deadline for chocolate pickup as November 1st so that entries could be made by Smart Tuition on those people who decided which option they wanted. 
For next year Mr. Woods will make sure more clearly that parental understanding appears on the sign off sheet. It is also just as important that parents read the blog carefully and ask office staff questions before over reacting because they did not read the policy.

Kitchen Update
The New York City Fire Department was here last Wednesday regarding the hood above the stove in the kitchen.
The Fire Department has ruled that the hood must be removed completely and a new hood installed with a venting system running through the rectory with an exit pipe on the rectory's roof.
This matter is being looked at the building commission of the Archdiocese and therefore the stove and convection ovens must remain off until the work is complete and approved by the
 NYC Fire Department. 
The kitchen was installed in 1980 and rules have changed over the years so children will continue to be served a cold lunch provided by the Archdiocese of New York's  Child Nutrition Program until the work is completed and approved. 



Registration facts for the 2018-2019 School Year 

December 1, 2017 :
Admissions open for NEW families

January 19, 2018:
Registrations for NEW and RETURNING families open
Re-Qualification for Financial Assistance opens for RETURNING families
Tuition & Fee rate sheets  will be available on January 12, 2018.

February 1, 2018:
Deadline for NEW families to submit complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications, including all required documentation, in order to receive a decision regarding Financial Assistance by March 15.

March 15, 2018:
Families who have submitted complete Admissions & Financial Assistance applications (including all required documentation) and who have been accepted by the school of interest by February 1, will receive email notices informing them of the results of their Financial Assistance applications by this date.

Monday - December 18, 2017
Please check with your child's teacher about classroom party on Thursday

Tuesday December 19, 2017
PreK For All Holiday Presentation 9:00 AM
8th grade Cake Sale 

Wednesday December 20,2017
Mrs. Claus arrives with the elves to visit students in PreK, Kindergarten and First Grades 

Thursday December 21, 2017
Lessons and Carols -- 8 :30 AM - All Grades - IN CHURCH. Parents welcome 
Dismissal at 3:15 PM 

Christmas Recess begins at dismissal - Classes resume January 3, 2017